Despite evidence to the contrary, I’m normally more of a writer than a reader. I know shocking, well hopefully not that shocking. Since I’ve been quite ill recently, I’ve not been in the right head space (read: awake) to create much of anything. But I have been puzzling around a new project, and prior to the plague, I had been in the middle of editing another novel. So what to do when on bed rest, and officially worn out from Netflix? Pinterest!

I’ve stumbled upon some rather helpful writing tip/motivational posts that I’d like to share both for my own future reference and simply because I enjoyed these. 🙂

5d3922a9d6de6a369437bc30a826e50f

 

This lovely article by Natasha Lester fits right into my NaNoWriMo, give it your all, messy first draft history. I’m a bit meticulous with planning and ironing things out, but one of my favorite things about writing is launching into a new project with nothing but an idea and some caffeine.

how-to-write-10000-words-in-a-day

 

Faye Kirwin breaks down what makes a productive long writing day, and while it’s been a while since I’ve had a 10k day, I know from experience that this method works. My longest writing day totaled just under 13,000 words but 8 and 10k days, especially when you’re in the middle of writing month challenges can be immensely fun and motivating. Even if you’d just like to bump your writing up from 500-1000 or 1000-2000 words a day, I’d recommend taking a look at this.

shrunken-manuscript-1024x574

 

Darcy Pattison’s Shrunken Head revision process is something I’m quite excited to try, though my broken printer is currently standing in the way. This is essentially a print out of her whole novel, allowing for a bird’s eye view on plots, subplots and character development for those times when you need to fix the big stuff before the little stuff.

automateediting-140x280

 

Finally Justin Mclachlan’s  tips for brushing up your draft are rock solid. These won’t fix all your problems but the neat little check list of things to search your manuscript for and then change will easily remove eye sores and headaches allowing you to make some of the bigger edits with ease.

 

So that’s all for today folks, at least from the writing front.

Happy scribbling, and happy reading.

Advertisements